Computing

Computing

Intent:

The Nottingham Emmanuel School’s Computer Science and Vocational IT curriculum envelops our three key values across all key stages:

  • Through collaboration of teachers and students to provide a progressive, reflective and modern computer science curriculum that matches the needs of both students and the ever-changing industry.
  • With excellence in the pillars of progression for computer science, information technology and digital literacy to ensure a challenging interleaved curriculum leading to success and further opportunities.
  • Founded on inclusion for all with pedagogy and practice to support, build and enable all students in our school to embrace a technology rich world with confidence.

Our KS3 curriculum will enable students to:

  • Understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation.
  • Analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Be responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

Our KS4 curriculum will enable students to:

  • Read, write and develop algorithms that include the constructs of sequence, selection, iteration and procedures.
  • Solve problems using computational thinking to program code in a structured way to write, test and debug programs using logical reasoning and approaches to refine problems across an array of contexts.
  • Develop a rich understanding of the technology that underpins computers through the fundamentals of binary representation, systems architecture, software and networking technologies.
  • Understand how the impact of technology effect safety, security of systems and the ethical, legal, cultural and environmental impacts of digital technology.

Students will experience this learning through:

  • Concept led support using disciplinary literacy, knowledge organisers and displays to aid lesson retrieval and revision.
  • Use of semantic waves to unplug, unpack and repack new concepts and ideas to secure learning.
  • Formative questioning, peer instruction and simple quizzes to uncover misconceptions to adapt teaching to address them as they occur.
  • A structured programming framework of PRIMM (Predict, Run, Investigate, Modify and Make) together with reading and exploring code first to review, interpret, read and trace code building confidence and the ability to write code.
  • Collaboration with peers with paired programming and peer instruction to stimulate classroom dialogue and development by working together.
  • Use of contextual examples and unplugged activities to make concepts concrete together with modelling using worked examples and live coding techniques to scaffold learners.
  • Sensory experiences to provide a creative and engaging context with hands on physical computing

Overview of our KS4 Curriculum:

OCR GCSE Computer Science (J277)

Computer Science is both engaging and practical, encouraging creativity and problem solving. It encourages you to develop your understanding and application of the core concepts in computer science. You will also analyse problems in computational terms and devise creative solutions by designing, writing, testing and evaluating programs.

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) in Computer Science consists of two compulsory components that are externally assessed.

Component 01: Computer systems

Introduces you to the central processing unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, data representation, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. It also looks at ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns associated with computer science.

  • This is a compulsory component.
  • It is worth 80 marks, representing 50% of the total marks for the GCSE (9–1).
  • This component is an externally assessed written examination testing AO1 and AO2.
  • The examination lasts 1 hour 30 minutes.
  • All the questions are mandatory.
  • The question paper will consist of short and medium answer questions. There will also be one 8-mark extended response question. This question will enable students to demonstrate the ability to construct and develop a sustained line of reasoning.


Component 02: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

You apply knowledge and understanding gained in component 01. You will develop skills and understanding in computational thinking: algorithms, programming techniques, producing robust programs, computational logic and translators.

  • This is a compulsory component.
  • It is worth 80 marks, representing 50% of the total marks for the GCSE (9–1).
  • This component is an externally assessed written examination testing AO1, AO2 and AO3.
  • The examination lasts 1 hour 30 minutes and is formed of two sections. All the questions are mandatory.
  • Section A is worth 50 marks and assesses students’ knowledge and understanding of concepts of Computer Science. Students then apply these to problems in computational terms, where they may use an algorithmic approach.
  • Section B is worth 30 marks and assesses students’ Practical Programming skills and their ability to design, write, test and refine programs.
  • The question paper will consist of short and medium answer questions.


OCR Level 1/Level 2 Cambridge National in IT

IT is both an engaging and practical course that enables students to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically. It embraces the fundamental principles and concepts of IT including the use of IT in the digital world, Internet of Everything, data manipulation and Augmented Reality.

OCR’s Cambridge National in IT consists of three compulsory components.


Component 01 (Unit R050): IT in the Digital World

Introduces you to the concepts of design tools, human computer interfaces, data and testing, cyber security and legislation, digital communications and finally, the Internet of Everything.

  • This is a compulsory component.
  • It is worth 70 marks, representing 40% of the total marks for the qualification.
  • This component is an externally assessed written examination testing PO1, PO2 and PO3.
  • The examination lasts 1 hour 30 minutes and is formed of two sections. All the questions are mandatory.
  • Section A is worth 15 marks will have a range of closed response, multiple choice and short response questions.
  • Section B is worth 55 marks and will have a scenario-based questions that will allow students to apply their knowledge and understanding of IT concepts to produce relevant responses. As part of this section, students will hand-draw/sketch their visual solution to a problem e.g., mind map, flowchart, visualisation diagram. This will be worth 8 marks. The extended response question is worth 9 marks.


Component 02 (Unit R060): Data Manipulation using Spreadsheets

In this unit students will learn the skills to be able to plan and design a spreadsheet solution to meet client requirements. They will be able to use a range of tools and techniques to create a spreadsheet solution based on their design, which they will test. Finally, students will be able to evaluate their solution based on the user requirements.

  • This is a compulsory component.
  • It is worth 60 marks, representing 30% of the total marks for the qualification.
  • This component is an internally assessed non-exam assessment (NEA) testing PO2, PO3 and PO4.
  • During the NEA, students will demonstrate their skills and understanding through 3 to 5 tasks in an exam board set assignment.


Component 03 (Unit R070): Using Augmented Reality to present information

In this unit students will learn the basics of Augmented Reality (AR) and the creation of a model prototype product to showcase how it can be used appropriately for a defined target audience to present information. They will also learn the purpose, use and types of AR in different contexts and how they are used on different digital devices. Students will develop the skills to be able to design and create an AR model prototype, using a range of tools and techniques. Finally, they will also be able to test and review their AR model prototype.

  • This is a compulsory component.
  • It is worth 60 marks, representing 30% of the total marks for the qualification.
  • This component is an internally assessed non-exam assessment (NEA) testing PO2, PO3 and PO4.
  • During the NEA, students will demonstrate their skills and understanding through 3 to 5 tasks in an exam board set assignment.

Links:

OCR GCSE Computer Science Information – https://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/computer-science-j277-from-2020/

OCR Cambridge National in IT Information – https://ocr.org.uk/qualifications/cambridge-nationals/it-level-1-2-j836/

BBC Bitesize (Computer Science) – https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zmtchbk

Craig ‘n’ Dave Computer Science – https://student.craigndave.org/J277


Careers links:

Studying Computer Science & IT can help develop transferable skills that can be applied to a vast range of different career paths. Click here for examples of some of the employability skills Computer Science & IT can provide.

Contact Us

The Nottingham Emmanuel School
Gresham Park Road
West Bridgford
Nottingham
NG2 7YF
E-mail: admin@emmanuel.nottingham.sch.uk
Tel: 0115 977 5380

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